Alderfer Decorative Arts Auction Sucess

Alderfer Auction is pleased to announce the success of their most recent Fine and Decorative Arts Auction in Hatfield, Pennsylvania.

With 91% of offered items being sold, and 50% of those items selling above high estimate, the sale was a refreshing and positive moment in a negative economic time. Attendance growth was strong with more than 15% new bidders participating in the auction that included local, national and international buyers. The wide variety of items offered attracted a diverse group of people who saw countless opportunities in the sale.

Regional Americana collectibles proved to be popular investments with buyers. The sale featured a large collection of stoneware coming out of the New? Hope, Pennsylvania, area. Several pieces were attributed to Richard Remmey including a three gallon pitcher which sold for $6,325. A rare “No Name” Gaudy Dutch teapot sold for $7,475.? Several theorems by David Ellinger were popular items in the sale, as bidders fought over them and bought them for more than double the high estimates. The international market took notice in the sale as well, competing over several quality pieces in a variety of categories. A set of four porcelain plaques, created in the 1920’s by one of the last great Chinese porcelain artists, received attention from early on. The set sold to a phone bidder for $47,150. A dagestan prayer rug received much attention and sold for four times the high estimate,? realizing $4,600.

A 100-lot collection of early Sweet Caporal baseball cards and pins was a hit with collectors, and surpassed all expectations. Countless pieces double or tripled high estimates, including a 1915 World Series ticket stub which was purchased for $1,725. This collection was a great example of unique specialties that Alderfer’s offers on a regular basis.

While many have reported a sluggish furniture market, buyers turned out in abundance and the crowds held throughout the day as a large grouping of items were offered. With estimates reflecting current market values, people saw opportunities to add a piece of furniture to their home collection. Buyers had a wide variety in every category of furniture to choose from. Tall case clocks, corner cupboards, sideboards and candle stands were some of the items that were offered in multiples at the sale, and allowed additional people to take interest, more than traditionally would have. A George Hagey tall case clock garnered $16,100. An 1802 Pennsylvania paint-decorated blanket chest sold for $12,650. A 17″ miniature tiger maple Sheraton chest sold for $7,475 after heavy floor, phone, and Internet competition. Also receiving much attention were several contemporary pieces of furniture, which drew their own crowd. A set of four George Nakashima “Mira” chairs were purchased for $6,900.

It might have been a cold rainy December night, but a sunny May Day was the highlight of the Friday evening art auction. The painting, completed in 1941 by acclaimed Pennsylvania Impressionist Daniel Garber, featuring a stone building painted in his signature peach color, stole the show. As the painting came up for sale, interest was found on the auction floor and the phone. After the phone bidder dropped out of the bidding war, the painting was sold to the floor bidder for $207,000, doubling low estimate expectations. This was one of countless examples of buyers who came out to purchase art to add to their personal collections. At a time when finances are on everyone’s mind, buyers saw opportunities to invest in paintings that they saw both financial value in as well as aesthetic value.

The sale of George Sotter’s Winter Hillside marked the highest sale by the artist in recent weeks as three additional Sotter paintings of similar subject matter (winter night scene) were offered at auctions spanning from Chicago to New York, all either failing to sell or realizing less money. The painting sold for $172,500 to an excited floor bidder who planned on adding the work to a growing collection. The Marker, depicting Providence, Rhode Island, a modernist composition by artist Karl Knaths sold for $21,850 – placing the sale of this painting in the top 2% of recorded prices for the artist at auction.

Alderfer Auction is excited about a new transition in 2009. Beginning in January 2009 Alderfer Auction, like every live auction, will depart from eBay. Alderfer’s is excited to begin the New Year with a new live Internet bidding platform. For additional information on their live Internet bidding, log on to www.alderferauction.com or call (215) 393-3023. Alderfer’s March 11, 12 and 13 Fine and Decorative Arts auction will feature an Asian art portion (March 20) in addition to the quality merchandise always offered at every quarterly sale.

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