AN IMPORTANT AND HISTORIC ON-SITE AUCTION IN GOSHEN, CONN., JUST GOT BETTER WITH THE ADDITION OF TWO ESTATES AND NEWLY FOUND TREASURES

. October 20, 2014

Items from prominent estates in Watertown and Old Greenwich are now part of the Nov. 1 sale.

GOSHEN, Conn. – An important on-site auction of three historic properties and the hundreds of treasures they hold, slated for Saturday, November 1st, just got better with the addition of estate items from prominent homes in Watertown and Old Greenwich, plus many new items that have only recently come to light after being unpacked and inventoried over the last month in Goshen.

“Don’t Give Up the Ship” 28-inch-long by 9-inch-tall carved eagle made around the turn of the century by William Shephard of Mystic, Conn.

“Don’t Give Up the Ship” 28-inch-long by 9-inch-tall carved eagle made around the turn of the century by William Shephard of Mystic, Conn.

The auction, set to start at 11 a.m. Eastern time, already included an eight-acre farm with historic 1812 farmhouse and outbuildings located at 227 Old Middle Street in Goshen, where the auction will happen; an historic 1831 country store located at 10 Old Middle Street (at Routes 63 and 4) in Goshen; and a circa-1900 historic home in Southbury known as ‘The Little Red Schoolhouse.’

Now add to that an historic 1870 home near the Green in charming Watertown that has been in the same family since 1900, plus its contents; and the contents of an upscale estate home in tony Old Greenwich, in Fairfield County. The Watertown home sits on an acre of land, at the corner of Route 63 and Woolson Street. A preview will be held on auction day, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

As a human interest aside, a 90-year-old lady who was part of the last graduating class from when ‘The Little Red Schoolhouse’ was still a school, in the 1940s, attended the Oct. 12 preview.

The cornucopia of items inside the buildings will be sold by Tim’s, Inc. Auctions of Bristol and Litchfield. They are so numerous and wide-ranging, many will be offered in multiple lots, often many boxes comprising one lot. Now, additional treasures from prominent estates in Watertown and Old Greenwich have also been added, showcasing an already packed and exciting auction.

The four historic properties will be offered at 11 a.m. by Litchfield Real Estate Auctions, LLC, brokers. The contents and treasures will be sold immediately afterward, at 12 noon, by Tim’s, Inc. Auctions. Offered will be a trove of Westmoreland Glass pieces, stunning estate jewelry items, wonderful period furniture, vintage lamps and lighting, gold and silver coins and more.

Discovered in the Old Greenwich estate, among the items that have been in the same family for decades, is a shelf clock made by Eli and Samuel Terry, the first clock makers in the United States, with woodworks made right in Goshen, where it will be sold, fittingly enough. A Goshen label right on the clock is proof. The early 19th century shelf clock features beautiful sailing ships in the lower glass, outstanding Hitchcock-style stenciling throughout and other unique features.

One of the highlight items from the Watertown home is an antique and highly collectible circa 1920s General Electric refrigerator – an older model, with the motor (or compressor) mounted on top. The refrigerator is even stocked with unopened vintage beer bottles, with beer, from the era.

Collectors of sports memorabilia will be astounded by an album containing dozens of signed photographs of baseball stars from years gone by, including Ted Williams and Mickey Mantle, plus some hockey and football autographs. The collector was a former decorated veteran of the Vietnam war, who used guile and determination to gather the autographs into one massive book. He passed away, and the entire proceeds of this lot will go toward paying for his burial expenses.

There are so many boxes of Westmoreland glass – easily 1,000 boxes or more – that some will be sold in multiple lots, as many as 50-60 boxes in a single offering. They were collected by the late Wilfred Reil of Litchfield, whose heirs are offering them now. The attic of the general store building is filled with china cabinets, bookcases and corner cabinets that are themselves filled with glass objects and other collectibles. Each cabinet will be sold, one by one, as a single lot.

Recently unpacked are huge leather-bound ledgers from Westmoreland Glass Company, a stack waist-high from the 1920s. Hand-written ledger entries document the firm’s business dealings with companies like Woolworth’s. Also just discovered are historical photos of the company that probably hung in the company’s main building and show some actual glass pieces that will be in the auction, plus a ‘30s-era photo that was used as a window display at a Philadelphia (Pa.) bank.

Even fine art will be in the sale, highlighted by a bronze bust of a lady by the noted French artist Emmanuel Villanis (1858-1914). The sculpture, titled Lucrece, was rendered in the 19th century.

Period furniture will feature laminated rosewood carved chairs attributed to John H. Belter of New York; a rosewood carved rococo marble-top table with magnificent three-dimensional carvings, attributed to either Belter or J. & J.W. Meeks; and a monumental 72 inch tall by 60 inch wide mirrored-back sideboard, heavily carved with original finish, by Belter or Meeks.

A pair of very different lots both carry an eagle theme. One is a “Don’t Give Up the Ship” 28-inch-long by 9-inch-tall carved eagle made around the turn of the century by William Shephard of Mystic, Conn., with stars, stripes and shield in a nautical motif. The other is a Black Forest humidor, 22 inches tall, with a full spread eagle at the top, monumental and beautifully carved.

Lamps and lighting will include a Pairpoint Puffy table lamp with hummingbirds and flowers and a Pairpoint cut glass table lamp with dome shade (both made in Meriden, Conn.); Gone With the Wind lamps, to include one with a cut jewel shade by Bradley & Hubbard and one with a deep red etched satin shade with ram’s heads at the base, signed Bradley & Hubbard; hall lamps with opalescent shades; and several nice pull down (or library) lamps in various shapes and sizes.

Estate jewelry promises to be an exciting category in the auction, with new and dazzling pieces being uncovered by the day. Sold will be a Victorian bow pin with diamonds and sapphires, set in 18kt gold and platinum; a ladies’ one-carat diamond ring; a pair of ancient (BC) Roman earrings; and a pair of David Webb (N.Y.) screw-back earrings complete with the original box.

Also sold will be 14kt and 18kt gold pocket watches; a circa-1790 century mid-Georgian pin with over one carat of diamonds and rubies; an Art Deco platinum diamond pin with sapphires, boasting over 3.5 carats of diamonds; and an early Victorian ladies’ necklace with diamonds and sapphires, with one carat of diamonds and white sapphires with natural golden pearls.

Still more jewelry will feature a stunning 18kt ladies’ diamond necklace with over one carat of diamonds; an 18kt ladies’ diamond and platinum ring with diamonds totaling just under three carats; a ladies’ single-stone 1.05-carat diamond ring; and a ladies’ diamond ring with two large diamonds totaling over two carats total weight. Also sold will be a lovely Cartier cigarette box.

The coins in the sale – and there will be many gold and silver coins, for the numismatists in the audience – were still being inventoried at press time.

Even classic and vintage automobiles will cross the auction block. These will include a 1949 Buick Special, black, in absolute like-new condition, with just 15,000 miles on the odometer; a 1957 Buick Special, turquoise in color inside and out, also in showroom condition, with lots of chrome; a 1951 Buick sedan; and a 1926 Ford Model T two-door sedan, in running condition. All of the vintage cars are currently on view at the Goshen General Store (10 Old Middle St.).

Decorative items and collectibles will feature bride’s baskets, pickle castors, Flow Blue china, perfume bottles, Wave Crest, mesh purses a Nantucket sewing basket with swinging handle, a Rookwood vase, Roseville pottery and more. At press time, boxes were being opened and yet more treasures were being discovered. This will probably go on right up to the date of auction.

‘The Little Red Schoolhouse’ building features high ceilings, two bedrooms and a large kitchen. For more information on any of the four historic properties, you may call Mary Helen Levine at 203-525-4753; e-mail is mhla@aol.com. Her website – www.litchfieldrealestateauctions.com – has pertinent forms and documents for prospective bidders, plus photos of all of the properties.

Goshen is a pretty town located 10 minutes north of Litchfield, in northwestern Connecticut. It is celebrating its 275th anniversary. Those unable to attend the auction in person may register to bid online at the Tim’s website (www.timsauctions.com), or through LiveAuctioneers.com. Telephone and absentee bids will also be taken. A buyer’s premium of 23% will be applied to all purchases.

For more information about Tim’s, Inc. Auctions and the upcoming November 1st on-site auction in Goshen, Conn., please visit www.timsauctions.com. The auction will open its doors at 9:30 a.m. See the Tim’s, Inc. Auctions website for all terms and conditions and to sign up to register to bid.

Category: Auction News

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